Australian

‘Stella Young’s letter to herself at 80 years old’

Stella Young


“I started calling myself a disabled woman, and a crip. A good thirteen years after seventeen-year-old me started saying crip, it still horrifies people. I do it because it’s a word that makes me feel strong and powerful. It’s a word other activists have used before me, and I use it to honour them.”

Before You Forget

Julia Lawrinson


Year Twelve is not off to a good start for Amelia. Art is her world, but her art teacher hates everything she does; her best friend has stopped talking to her; her mother and father may as well be living in separate houses; and her father is slowly forgetting everything. Even Amelia.

Everything Beautiful

Simmone Howell


Riley Rose doesn’t want to be at Spirit Ranch Holiday Camp. But is everything at the Spirit Ranch as it appears? What secrets are waiting for discovery in the abandoned Fraser house? And why doesn’t anyone want to talk about the accident that landed the mysterious Dylan in a wheelchair last year?

Welcome to Orphancorp

Marlee Jane Ward


If she can just keep out of trouble, Mirii Mahoney is going to taste freedom for the first time, but she’s fighting against the system, against the other kids, and against herself.

The Big Black Thing

Sweatshop


The Big Black Thing: Chapter 1 is the first issue in a new series of prose and poetry by emerging and established writers from Indigenous, migrant and refugee backgrounds.

Eat the Sky, Drink the Ocean

Kirsty Murray, Payal Dhar and Anita Roy (eds)


An intercontinental collection of speculative stories, in prose and graphic form, with contributions from India and Australia that include a nursery story with a twist, a futuristic take on reality TV, a play script with tentacles – and much more.

Dark Dreams: Australian refugee stories by young writers aged 11–20 years

Sonja Dechian, Heather Millar, Eva Sallis (eds)


This unique anthology of essays, interviews, and stories is written by children and young adults. The stories are the finest of hundreds collected through a nationwide schools competition in 2002. The essays and stories represent many different countries and themes.